New York Times: Mental Health Visits Rise as Parent Deploys

November 08, 2010  |  Posted by Daniel Pollitt

In today's New York Times, Benedict Carney gives us a tragic view into the effects of repeated deployments of military service members on the mental health of their children:

In the study, a research team led by Dr. Gregory H. Gorman of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences analyzed the health records of 642,397 children ages 3 to 8 with parents in the military. It compared the frequency of health visits from 2006 to 2007 when a parent was deployed with those when the parent was home.

 

The researchers found that the children saw a doctor or other health professional about six times a year and about once every two years for a mental health reason. During deployment of a parent, however, the visit rate dropped by about 11 percent for physical problems but rose by 11 percent for psychological complaints. Stress, anxiety and attention-deficit problems were among the more common diagnoses, and mothers were far more likely than fathers to take a child to a doctor.

 

Read the whole article here

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